Archive for February, 2001

SAAB 96 in Ohio

Posted on 25. Feb, 2001 by .

0

saab96 b SAAB 96 in Ohio

Driving home from a weekend at friends in the country, I noticed the gas
gauge getting low enough for the 8 gallons of gas to mix with a quart of
oil required in Dad’s 1967 Saab 96. Pulled into a SOHIO station just
outside of the middle of nowhere for a fillup. For you youngsters, this
was in 1969 when ‘Self Serve’ hadn’t been invented yet, so the attendant
trotted out to the drivers side and asked the inevitable “Fill-er-up?”
“Sure” I replied. “But first pour in this can of oil.”
“No problem, just pop the hood for me.” When I explained the oil went in
the gas tank, I got one of those deer in the headlight looks.
“You can’t do that, boy!”
“No problem, it’s a 2 stroke motor”
“A what? Oil goes in the motor!”
“I know, but this is a 2 stroke motor, no valves, and the oil mixes with
the gas.”
Now, I will admit this was not the best year nor place to have long hair,
but at this point the attendant flew in to a rage about how the youth of
America was just crazy with all the dope going around and he didn’t want
any of it at his station and ordered me off his property. The more I tried
to explain, the more upset he got. I always made it a point to honk and
wave every time I drove by that station in Dad’s Saab after that!

My first car I could legally drive was a hand me down from Dad; a 1967
Saab 96. Just what every 16 year old in 1969 looked forward to!? Well, it
was priced right and pretty economical to drive once I replaced the clutch
and front tires. My Saab taught me that it didn’t take raw horse power to
light up the tires, just a lack of brains. I used the car to drive to
school my senior year and took a lot of ribbing about it, especially when
the muscle car crowd got a look under the hood! None of them understood 2
strokes and thought the motor was out of a lawn mower or some thing.
To get on with the story, there was one class mate of mine that bragged
he never paid for gas. He carried a five gallon can and a piece of hose
and ‘borrowed’ gas when ever he needed it. I guess I mentioned one day
that he should be careful not to ‘borrow’ gas from my car. Well, you all
know where this is going. Sure enough a day later he came chugging into
the school parking lot blowing clouds of blue smoke. Worst case of fouled
plugs any Ford every suffered.

It can be amazing where you can find nice people these days. If you
watch TV news you can always tell where not to find them, in fact from
watching TV you might think none exists outside of your own home. Well let
me tell you otherwise.
My Dad has recently been diagnosed as suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.
His short term memory has been going for a number of years but his last
heart attack took what ever was left. He still laughs when he should but
doesn’t always no why. With the help of the staff at a very nice nursing
home in Aurora, Ohio we are trying to make Dad’s days more comforting. One
suggestion was to make a memory photo book. A simple photo of things from
his past; friends, families and hobbies that he enjoyed. Mom said she
would take care of family photos, so I volunteered to take hobbies.
My Dad’s favorite car was a 1967 powder blue Saab 96 It was bigger,
faster, and rode much nicer than the 1960 DKW 750 that it replaced and Dad
showed it off every where we went. Every car after that was compared to
the Saab but none measure up. I looked for hours trying to find a photo of
that car before turning to the innernet. Found a site with Saab club links
that lead me to the New England Saab Association page. That lead me to
Ryan Emge. A name, a person I had never met and may never meet. But
within minutes of sending a request for a photo of a 1967 powder blue Saab
96, the name of a person that jumped into the project with every resource
he had. That was Friday. This morning I came in to work, signed on to
E-mail to find a letter from Ryan with an attached photo!! Just what the
doctor order!
You may not hear about nice people on the 6:00 news or read about them in
the daily paper, but they are out there. If you are every driving through
New Salem, MA, honk and wave at every Saab that goes by. It might be Ryan,
it might not. But knowing Ryan as little as I do, I would guess that most
fellow Saab enthusiasts in town know him as a nice guy.

Paul L. Kort

Contact Information
NEW ENGLAND SAAB ASSOCIATION
P.O. BOX 119
KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03431

E-mail info@nesaab.org

Continue Reading

Doug's SAAB Story

Posted on 25. Feb, 2001 by .

0

Doug’s SAAB Story

The first car I ever owned was a 1984 SAAB 900 Turbo. This sweet silver beauty
was the best vehicle In the world. Patty and I were together
for over 70,000 miles. Being a mechanical engineer by training, we became very
intimate and I know her inside and out. Last summer, together
with my good friend, and fellow Saab Lover, Carl Edberg, we drove to the
National Owner’s convention in Waterville Valley NH. Let me say,
for a true SAAB fanatic, this was the pinnacle. There I spent too much money on
parts, posters, hats, etc etc. I even won a t-shirt in the Master
technician tent.

To make a long story short, it was here that I first fell in love with the sweet
flowing lines of the second generation SAAB Sonett. In 1984 Motor
Week magazine referred to the Sonett 2 as an “Over-trendy coke bottle fastback.”
Being a trendy guy, and a former Coca-cola employee to
boot, this was the perfect car for me. In September, 1997 I finally got the
object of my desire. I found a Cherry-red 1969 Sonett V-4 for sale
down in CT. I installed a home-made trailer hitch to the back of my 900, rented
a car dolley and headed on down. She had been sitting in the
back of the owner’s garage for almost 17 years. The body was faded, but in great
shape, the interior was smelly, but complete. Everything
seemed pretty good, and well worth the price. The frame was very rusted, and we
found a mouse nest inside, but overall she was a keeper. It
took us about an hour to get the rear brakes to release so we could tow it home.
But with minimal trouble she was mine!!!

The drive home was uneventful. Fearful that my turbo would die in the VT hills I
had another friend tow it up to Burlington with his Cherokee.
When I got it home, we discovered that somewhere along the way the battery had
fallen out, but besides that everything was in as good a shape
as hoped.

Now the restoration is in process. A whirlwind ski vacation to Lake tahoe in
March, 1998 meant the end for the old 84. My roommate Craig
Pepper and I made it out there (3200 miles one-way) in 52 hours where we met up
with the rest of the non-flying group(15 total). Most of the
trip we were at 90-100 mph for an average speed of 61.5 miles per hour,
including all stops. Unfortunately the last 150 miles took us 6 hours as
we limped on a thrashed fuel pump. $400 in repairs and 5 days of skiing later,
we left CA for the trip home… This time the same 3,200 miles in
48 hours!!! And the car turned 200,000 miles about 30 miles west of Chicago (at
105 mph, of course) The picture came out a bit blurry.

The replacement for the worn-out 84 (tranny troubles) is my current 89 Rose
Quartz 900 Turbo 5 door 5-speed. Currently unnamed, this vehicle
has taken a little time away from the restoration as I prepare her to my liking.
In addition, the purchase of a 1973 Tanzer-22 ft sailboat has also
taken a considerable amount of effort. Purchased for a song, “Fiasco” required
240 hours of labor before she could be launched. This was
accomplished in an intense 2-week period while I also held a full-time job. Over
the two weeks myself and my co-owner, Brian Kenney, put in
80 hours of labor each. We also had a combined total of 80 hours from our other
15 or so helpers. Now I sail too much and restore too little…
but fall is approaching and I hope to change all that!!

Douglas A Hartwel, South Burlington, VT

Contact Information
NEW ENGLAND SAAB ASSOCIATION
P.O. BOX 119
KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03431

E-mail info@nesaab.org

Continue Reading

My First Car

Posted on 25. Feb, 2001 by .

0

My First Car

My first car that I actually owned not a loaner from a
parent. Was a blue 1984 900 . I named him Spider. Paid $3000
for him in 1993. I thought it was a good deal. Because the previous owner
was not nice to the car, I paid another $3-4000, fixing him up but I loved
him anyway.

Eventually we invested in a junked 82′ model to help speed up
the repairs. Then when we were done with it we sold it to a local junkyard
for $25. I recently found out that the junkyard sold the junked 82′ again
for a $1000. Ha it figures!!! But my Spider is doing fine.

We got tired of fixing him because I am a nanny and need a reliable car
everyday so, we decided a newer model is what we really needed,so last
September my fiance purchased for me a 1993 9000 cs. Fire engine red!!
I decided to name him Red rover, a name that suits him especially when
passing other cars!!! I did not trade my Spider in to the dealer when I
got my new car though. I sold it to a Saab mechanic that my fiance knows
from all of the repair work we did on the car. I decided that I did not
care how much I sold my car for because its more than just a car to me.
So I gave the car away to our friend for $600. Just enough to pay for my
newer car to get on the road! So I lost money but who cares at least
the car went to a good home.

Heather Henry, Worcester, MA

Contact Information
NEW ENGLAND SAAB ASSOCIATION
P.O. BOX 119
KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03431

E-mail info@nesaab.org

Continue Reading

Our Ski trip to Maine

Posted on 25. Feb, 2001 by .

0

Our Ski trip to Maine

We went skiing in Maine..3 years ago..in January. A big thaw hit, and rain.
We got caught in the middle of it. Roads to Sunday River Ski resort were all
out of commission. Its now 3am and its now freezing. (This is when it gets good)
We proceeded around about route, and encountered an ice flow (flooded river with
snow bergs, covering the entire road for about 200 yards, and water windshield
high:)

We had to proceed(not knowing the water was that high). We got to the middle of
the flow (hood high with water) and the Saab died( duh..no kidding). Luckily,
a local Mainer was in the area with a big 4 wheel drive. He pushed us out of the
water (Arctic Sea)to dry pavement. We thought we would be spending the night in
the Maine National Forest,but no…The Saab only needed the removal of the air
filter ( which was frozen ), and we were off and running again. Here is the scary
part! We were waiste high in freezing water IN THE CAR.The car actually floated
for a bit down river till the water came in the car..(Thank GOD) Alarm going nuts
and finally complete deadness. We got the Saab going and drove it to Sunday River,
where it completely froze for the next few days( had to pry the door open to get
in it)

To sum the story,,,,,SAABS RULE….that was death for most other cars, and us also,
if was not for Saab……Thanx Saab

BTW…It was a 94 900 turbo…..never had a prob after that!
Good luck all, and thanx for your attention!

Kurt Johnson, N Kingstown RI

Contact Information
NEW ENGLAND SAAB ASSOCIATION
P.O. BOX 119
KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03431

E-mail info@nesaab.org

Continue Reading

400,000 miles and going strong

Posted on 21. Feb, 2001 by .

0

400,000 miles and going strong

My first car I have been totaly in love with my 85 Turbo for over 400,000 miles.
.I have been looking to purchase a new car but can’t for the life of me seem
to give up on this fine
quality car that works with me day after day for 15 years.
It’s a black 3 door that is in excellent condition. people can’t beleive it’s 15
years old. My twin boys are waiting for me to turn it over to them or at this
point are waiting for me to turn over..I’m not sure..but either way, I
expressed that if I ever decide to stop running her I would
bring her to our barn in maine for future storage.

just to give you the low down on her past repairs and to let you know how hard
it’s been to give up on her, here is some facts:

minor repairs from 85-91

lost trans (reverse)in 93
used car without reverse for two years!, learned to park and drive without it…
great tips for anyone who has the same problem.

95 fixed trans only because i lost 5th gear and doing only
45mph on highways was not fun

general repairs 96-98

blew head gasket in spring of 98 (minor repair)

lost front drivers seat in fall of 99, purchased two newer
ones from PA (feels great again)

total repairs and gas, ins, taxes, tires(seven sets) has brought this car to .08
cents a mile to operate!!!!!! how can I even match this with a new car!!!! and
it stills looks great. and I have the original TURBO still working fine…

So to all of you thinking of giving up……DON’T.. They don’t make them this
way any more!

Paul Spurling, Natick, MA

Contact Information
NEW ENGLAND SAAB ASSOCIATION
P.O. BOX 119
KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03431

E-mail info@nesaab.org

Continue Reading

Saab Rescue Car – the world's safest car

Posted on 08. Feb, 2001 by .

0

1001917 Saab Rescue Car   the world's safest car

Photo Credit: Saab Automobile

2001-02-08

Saab’s safest-ever rally venture: Saab Rescue Car – the world’s safest car

When the International Swedish Rally sets off on Thursday this week, four specially equipped Saab 9-5 SportWagon cars will be standing by on the starting lines, ready to save life if any of the competing world’s top rally drivers were to become involved in an accident. The Saab Rescue Car is part of the latest – and possibly the most important – new team in the 2001 World Championship Rally Series.

The cars were developed in cooperation between Svenska Bilsportförbundet (the Swedish Automobile Sport Federation) and Saab, and they carry the very latest equipment for emergency medical care, fire fighting, recovery and communication.
“We will have a Saab Rescue Car standing by at the starting line of every special stage. This will enable us to set off immediately to the scene of an accident if an alarm is raised, and to begin the rescue work without delay,” says Anders Wikström, Project Leader at Svenska Bilsportförbundet.
A Saab Rescue Car will have a crew of three persons, each with special competence in different fields:

* An experienced driver, preferably with a good measure of knowledge of rescue work and medical care
* A doctor who is trained in emergency medical care
* A professional fire-fighter

The four cars were built by Team Motorsport and Anders Norstedt, who is a fireman and competition driver and whose qualifications include a European Champion title in rallycross in a Saab 900. The work was done in cooperation with Saab technicians.

A fully equipped emergency bag of the same type as those employed in disasters and major accidents will be used for attending to the victims of possible accidents. The fire-fighting equipment is based on a patented high-pressure technique that effectively extinguishes fires by means of a water mist.

The cars are also equipped with cutting tools designed to release the occupants trapped in a crashed car. Every Saab Rescue Car is equipped with an motor-driven cutting tool with a cutting force of 30.6 tonnes, and equipment that can prise open a crashed car body. To be able to power these tools, the cars are equipped with an extra generator and a converter unit with a 220-volt output.

A portable cutting tool is also included in the rescue equipment for use in accidents in which the car has ended up out in the terrain and can be reached only on foot. The tool is driven by a pyrotechnic charge of the same type as that used for airbags, and enables metal to be cut without the use of external sources of power.

“Safety is one of the cornerstones in our work of developing cars at Saab. And it was as natural for the Automobile Sport Federation to turn to Saab in search of a system for developing these cars as it was for us to put our cars and expertise at their disposal,” says Björn Berglöf at the Saab Technical Development Department and Saab’s representative in the project.

For further information, please phone
Bo Swanér at Saab Automobile
tel +46 705 28 11 91 (mobile)
Anders Wikström, Svenska Bilsportförbundet
tel +46 8 626 33 12 (direct line)

Continue Reading




Production Concept